All Posts By:

Jason Shemchuk

Dry fly fishing Pennsylvania
Photo from Trevor Smith.
Podcast

Dry Fly Fishing and Versatility with the Mono Rig with Trevor Smith – Podcast – Ep 92

Dry fly fishing in Pennsylvania with the Mono Rig was one of the most lasting memories of my fly fishing journey. Casting blue winged olives in the silent, snowy, solitude of a beautiful river I’d never stepped foot in before was remarkable. I had never fished dries in the snow, let alone on the Mono Rig. Both proved to be deeply rewarding.
Fly fishing gear
Tactics and Techniques

How to Avoid Forgetting Your Fly Fishing Gear.

It’s not likely any of us will escape our fly fishing journey without arriving at the river having forgotten something.  It’s more likely that, if you are reading this, you already know the pain.  If not, remember there are those who have and those who will.  Sometimes it's no big deal.  Forgot our water bottle?  Fish thirsty.  A box of dry flies?  Fish nymphs.  Raincoat?  Fish wet.  But some items cannot be fished through.  Some things are deal breakers.  I’ll admit it’s been more than once I have reached a trout stream without a critical piece of gear.  It was after one of these exceptionally deflating days that I finally decided enough was enough.  I  committed to solving the problem in the only way I knew how.  Applying mental checklists in the way I did during my time flying fighters for the Air Force.
Photo from Cameron Cushman
Podcast

WOT 82: Chasing Native Trout and Veteran Fly Fishing with Cameron Cushman

Cameron is a veteran who is making a difference in the lives of other veterans in a profoundly meaningful way. His films tell the stories of how our soldiers are being healed through fly fishing. They are beautiful pieces of videography and storytelling but they also represent what is possible for people that are running out of hope. Families that need help. His work with the Iron Freedom Foundation is saving lives. I believe it.
Lessons Learned (Stories)

Rock or Trout? How to Know For Sure.

Spotting fish is easy, until it’s not.  We all know what a fish looks like and when it’s obvious, sight fishing moves along nicely.  But mother nature has a tendency to make things tough.  There’s a reason these trout are so beautiful.  They blend in with their surroundings, and we all know “trout don’t live in ugly places.”  Rocks and stones along river bottoms combined with debris, vegetation, or branches do a good job of fooling us and helping trout.  There are lots of things we can do to help us spot fish and tell the difference but only a few ways to know for sure.  How can we be certain what we are looking at is not a rock?  There are only two guarantees.  Catch it or spook it.  Even though catching fish is the goal, both will improve your sight fishing game over time.  Here’s how…
Photo from Taylor Joyce.
Podcast

WOT 72: The South Holston River and Including Newcomers with Taylor Joyce.

We've all been there. Sometimes it's hard to remember our beginnings in fly fishing. We can forget the things we take for granted. When I began fly fishing I was "dry or die" out of ignorance, not preference. The mechanics of fly line, leader, and tippet were foreign. Tactics were nowhere in my crosscheck. I wish I had learned so many things, so much faster. The importance of a natural drift. Getting my flies down while nymphing.  When to switch flies, or just switch water.  And so many other tools I have picked up and am still gathering. About the only thing I had going for me was reading water (thanks Pop). But that's part of the journey isn't it?  Filling the toolbox.  Still, being in that place, and seeking progress, made a kind word of advice from another angler that much more special.